Victoria L. – Bell Gardens High School

Money Savers

In my opinion on what young adults can do to become better savers is to have a build in  emergency funds.  It can make all the difference. Low-income families with at least $500 in an emergency fund are better off financially than moderate-income families with less saved up. Also, an emergency fund is a bank account with money set aside to cover large, unexpected expenses, such as a major auto repair, or a financial crisis, such as job loss or large medical bills.

The financial buffer an emergency fund provides can keep you afloat in a time of need without having to rely on credit cards or take out high-interest loans. This is especially important if you already have these obligations. Set a monthly savings goal. This will get you into the habit of saving regularly and will make the task less daunting. One way to do this is by automatically transferring funds to your savings account each time you get paid. If there’s no money left, cut expenses. See which parts of your monthly spending you can trim, so you’ll have cash left over to build your fund.

Some ways to save include carpooling, cooking more meals at home, saving leftovers and avoiding small daily purchases such as takeout coffee.  Another way to save money is Establish your budget. Are you looking for an easy way to begin? On the first day of a new month, get a receipt for everything you purchase. Stack the receipts into categories like restaurants, groceries, and personal care. At the end of the month you will be able to clearly see where your money is going. Also is to set realistic goals for your money will help you make smart spending choices. Ask yourself: What do I want my finances to look like in one year?

Decide what’s important to you and start there.  The thing is to separate the Needs & Wants Ask yourself: Do I want this or do I need it? Will spending this money get me closer to my financial goals or further away? Can I live without it? Set clear priorities for yourself and the decisions become easier to make. The last thing is to design your budget Make sure that you are not spending more than you make. Balance your budget to accommodate everything you need to pay for.

The next thing that young adults can do to become better money-savers is about entertainment things that we can cut down on. Get unadvertised theater ticket discounts. Call, email, or tweet your nearby theater to ask about discount options that are often not well-advertised. Many theaters offer discounted seats for seniors, students, and young adults, such as pay-your-age or pay-what-you-can programs. Or they’ll offer rush discounts of any unsold seats immediately before a show. Take advantage of your library. More and more libraries are offering e-books, so you don’t even need to visit in person. Many libraries are also part of an intra-library loan system where you can borrow anything you want, but that they don’t have, for a minimal shipping charge. Just ask. And some libraries allow you to borrow things like tools and sewing machines.

Finally is that on what things can they do to remain debt free is to While many factors could be in play here, one of the most likely reasons is the second family has created a habit of overspending. They earn a great income, but they probably spend beyond their budget, which leaves them with less money and causes a lot of tension around the house. That’s a difficult and stressful way to live. The people who overcome that stress realize they have to handle money differently and make some lifestyle changes. When they make those adjustments, they begin to establish certain characteristics that are super important when it comes to becoming debt-free and staying that way. They Use Self-Control Someone who really wants to get out of debt has the willpower to walk right past the shoe section or the flat-screen TV aisle without making an impulse purchase. They aren’t swayed to buy something simply because it’s on sale that day. They are wise enough to know purchasing something isn’t going to erase all their problems and make them feel better. Why? Because they know not to buy those things unless they can pay cash.